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Marble vs Quartz: Comparison from 7 Factors

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Quartz, granite, and marble are three of the best and most popular countertop options on the market. Over the past few decades, marble countertops have been the focal point of homes for many years. Then there are quartz countertops, which have also grown in popularity in recent years as a viable alternative to granite and marble. But how do these two stone materials compare to each other? That’s the question this guide will answer.

In this article, we’ll guide you through these two stones, marble and quartz, and help you decide which material is right for your home design. We’ll weigh up the pros and cons of each of the two stone materials and explain how each one might be suitable for your home remodel.

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Table of Contents

I. Overview of marble

Through hundreds of years of heat and pressure, marble is naturally produced. Other mineral hues will show up in the stone as veins or swirls that vary in depth and size and lack repetitive or symmetrical patterns. Additionally, marble has some translucency, which frequently enables you to see a few millimeters beyond the surface and gives the substance greater depth.

Because marble is relatively soft and simple to cut and carve, it is quite popular with artists and architects. The best technique to determine whether marble is real is to test its hardness by cutting it with a sharp object, such a knife. Genuine marble countertops may etch and become scratched over time. If you use a knife to scratch the top of marble slabs, avoiding the underside, and there is no visible damage, the surface is presumably granite or manufactured stone.

A metamorphic rock, marble originates from limestone and takes millions of years to form. It is most often associated with Italy, and most of the world’s supply is mined in the Carrara region around northern Tuscany.

When it comes to building materials, marble is unquestionably a classic and timeless option. Natural stone has been utilized to build anything from the most famous statues in the world to countertops for kitchens and bathrooms, serving as proof of this. Although there are many lovely countertop materials available, many homeowners simply don’t believe that marble can be matched in beauty.

Properties of marble

Exterior

Marble can range in color from black to pure white. Marble is often available in a variety of colours, styles and ornate textures. Many of them have elegant grains, and the beauty of marble countertops is undoubtedly incomparable. If the marble is free of any impurities, it will be pristine pure white. However, most marble contains other minerals that can give it a blue, gray, pink, yellow or black color. However, the colors will not be very vibrant. Any other bright and vibrant color could indicate that the marble is man-made or a natural stone mixed with other materials.

Trait

It’s cool and soft to the touch, especially compared to other materials like granite. But it’s porous, making it sensitive to acidic liquids like wine or certain cleaners. Marble can be prone to etching or staining if left unprotected—however, these problems can be easily fixed with a sealed marble countertop and an extra layer of protection. You have to reseal your marble countertops several times a year.

While much of marble’s appeal lies in its looks, the material is also relatively durable and has a timeless appeal to homeowners.

Advantages

1. Timeless appeal, available in a variety of colors and styles.
2. Durable.
3. Luxuriously, marble is considered the material of choice for luxury apartment and residential buildings. It’s beautiful, and a proper marble countertop is a real star in any kitchen.
4. Real marble also has an unrivaled luster. This is often replicated in synthetic stone by adding small amounts of glass and other materials, but it doesn’t have the same long-lasting luster as marble.

Disadvantages

1. Price: One of the most costly countertop materials available is marble, priced per square foot. It is much more expensive than butcher block, even more expensive than quartz or granite. Get a quote before you fall in love with marble—it might not fit your remodeling budget.

2. Protection: Unlike granite and quartz, marble countertops are not scratch-resistant. You need to use a cutting board and take extra care to protect your countertops from accidental damage.

3. Stains: Marble absorbs liquids more readily than other stone countertops. This can be bad news for your kitchen, as it means you need to be vigilant about spills and cutting boards. Acids and harsh cleaning agents can cause damage.

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II. Overview of quartz

When stone countertops first became popular, granite was the obvious choice for many homeowners. Quartz countertops, as an alternative, have become very popular recently. Quartz is genuine stone that has been processed and sealed into a protective resin, as opposed to granite, which is cut from raw stone and then sealed. As a result, quartz countertops can be like almost anything: They can take on patterns, colors, and looks that natural stone doesn’t.

Marble and granite are rocks, while quartz is a mineral made of silica; it is also the most prevalent mineral found in the Earth’s crust. Although pure quartz is transparent, impurities present in it give it a variety of beautiful colors. Some of the highest quality quartz is used in jewelry and even sculpture. The best part: there’s no sealing required, and it’s scratch, etch, and heat resistant.

While quartz occurs naturally, quartz countertops are man-made. To create quartz countertops, manufacturers must use a mixture of ground quartz stone (about 90%) and resins and polymers (about 10%). There are several “quartz countertops” that are actually a mixture of pulverized marble, granite, and other natural stones. Better to refer to these as synthetic stones.

Properties of quartz

Element

Quartz countertops must be created, as opposed to marble and granite, which may be mined, polished, and sold. The reason is that about 90% of the quartz used for countertops is natural quartz stone that is ground and mixed with about 10% resin. Because these countertops are manufactured, the look can be customized to mimic marble, granite, or any other color.

Surface design

Although quartz countertops are engineered, their surface is very attractive. Quartz is real stone that has been worked and sealed into a protective resin. As a result, quartz countertops can be like almost anything: They can take on patterns, colors, and looks that natural stone doesn’t. Quartz countertops can be found in a wide variety of forms, including some that imitate real stones like granite and marble, because they are manufactured. The non-porous nature of these surface patterns, which distinguishes them from marble and granite, is another advantage. In contrast to granite and marble worktops, quartz countertops don’t need to be sealed as thoroughly.

Quartz countertops seem to come in a variety of colors and patterns. To tell if you’re looking at real stone or engineered countertops, look closely at the pattern on the counter. Every granite or marble slab is unique. In the case of natural stone, no two areas of the stone will look identical. Because quartz slabs are manufactured, they tend to be fairly uniform in color and consistency, with little variation in pattern and texture. However, as new ways of engineering quartz plates emerge, the possibilities of things to do with this material are always increasing, so it’s hard to be sure.

Homeowners often turn to quartz as an alternative not only to granite and marble, but also to materials like solid surfaces. Quartz is superior to solid surface counters despite being comparable to granite and marble in terms of quality. The benefits and drawbacks of quartz are displayed in the table below.

Advantages

1. Variety: Quartz countertops come in more color and design variations than granite or marble, which means they can go with more kitchen styles.

2. Maintenance Free: Unlike granite, quartz countertops are permanently resin-sealed and do not require periodic resealing.

3. Durable: Quartz, while not invulnerable, can withstand everyday wear and tear and is stain-resistant.

4. Solid: Quartz is inherently non-porous.

5. Flexibility: Quartz also has a degree of flexibility, which increases its resistance to chipping, breaking, or other damage.

Disadvantages

1. Not heat resistant: Unlike granite countertops, quartz countertops cannot withstand high heat and may be damaged or discolored by the heat. You’ll want to keep using hot pads and trivets when cooking or baking.

2. Manufacture: Granite and marble slabs convey the beauty of natural stone, while quartz countertops have a manufactured “finished” look. This will appeal to some, but make sure you’re comfortable with it before buying.

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III. Comparasion: Marble VS Quartz

Many quartz countertops are a mixture of granite, marble, and other stones, as well as quartz, and are therefore called “engineered stone.” Marble is natural with little variation in appearance, while quartz can mimic granite and marble, or have a completely different appearance. Quartz comes in many colors and patterns.

The main difference between quartz and marble is a weakness. Marble is a soft stone that can be easily damaged, so it is less common in high-traffic kitchen areas and more attractive in bathrooms. Quartz is not as easily damaged as marble and is less porous, so it won’t stain as quickly.

1. Cost

Other considerations might not be as important as the countertop’s price. Cost is the first factor most people consider when picking something for their home. Let’s take a look at the average cost of marble and quartz countertops.

– Marble: Between $40 and $300 per square foot.

– Quartz: Between $50 and $200 per square foot.

2. Durability

The durability of the countertop is key. By this we mean the scratch resistance of the countertop as well as its longevity.

– Marble: Marble countertops can get scratched and scratched because at some point it is not easy to use a kitchen countertop without being rough. These countertops are a luxury, but not a practical one.

– Quartz: Quartz can be scratched and chipped. If you drop a heavy pan on it, you may need to repair it, but small scrapes won’t last long.

3. Water resistance

We wouldn’t count water resistance as durability. The cans are waterproof. It doesn’t affect how easily the countertop gets scratched and damaged.

– Marble: Due to the porous surface, marble can absorb any liquid that is splashed on it. You’ll need to be careful not to splash on it, and use a waterproof cover to seal the countertop.

– Quartz: Quartz is water resistant. The reason is that it is made of resin, making sure that you buy it waterproof. You don’t need to use the same type of sealant to seal it.

3. Water resistance

We wouldn’t count water resistance as durability. The cans are waterproof. It doesn’t affect how easily the countertop gets scratched and damaged.

– Marble: Due to the porous surface, marble can absorb any liquid that is splashed on it. You’ll need to be careful not to splash on it, and use a waterproof cover to seal the countertop.

– Quartz: Quartz is water resistant. The reason is that it is made of resin, making sure that you buy it waterproof. You don’t need to use the same type of sealant to seal it.

4. Sustainability

Sustainability deserves a mention. The term sustainability means “the ability to maintain a certain rate or level”. If the material is not readily available, then it is not sustainable.

– Marble: Marble is sustainable. It is not as durable as quartz. Marble is still sustainable, but quartz is more sustainable.

– Quartz: Quartz is a green material with a long lifespan and can be recycled. These elements make quartz one of the most environmentally friendly countertop materials.

5. Heat resistance

Sustainability deserves a mention. The term sustainability means “the ability to maintain a certain rate or level”. If the material is not readily available, then it is not sustainable.

– Marble: Marble is sustainable. It is not as durable as quartz. Marble is still sustainable, but quartz is more sustainable.

– Quartz: Quartz is a green material with a long lifespan and can be recycled. These elements make quartz one of the most environmentally friendly countertop materials.

6. Installation

If you can install one type of stone countertop, you will have no problem installing the other. The difference is in the cutting. Sink openings and smooth edges vary. Let’s take a closer look at the installation of the two types of countertops, marble and quartz.

– Marble: Marble is easier to cut than quartz because it is more compact, but heavier. There’s less dust and it’s ready to use when you’re halfway through. Wet cut like quartz, take your time.

– Quartz: Cutting quartz creates a lot of dust. This is something to be aware of as you should be wearing goggles and a mask. Use a wet saw with a diamond plate and prepare it to be polished.

7. Versatility

Versatility is important for those who want to get creative and make a statement. If creativity is your priority, then you need to know about countertop versatility.

– Marble: Numerous colors are available in natural marble. A common choice for marble in dreams is Carrera. Pink, red, brown, white, cream, and green are some of the others. You might have noticed that marble is available in most colors.

– Quartz: White or at least having a white backdrop, true quartz is. Although colored quartz comes in a range of natural hues, the majority are white, gray, or cream.

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IV. Conclusion

When it comes time to purchase new countertops, you want to make a decision that will satisfy you now and in the future. Installing a kitchen countertop or bathroom countertop can add the finishing touches to any home renovation. While you’ll have to ultimately decide which one is right for your home, this section will help you decide.

Marble is a great choice if you want a durable countertop with timeless appeal that comes in a variety of colors and styles. As long as you don’t mind maintaining it, including resealing it every few months, and are willing to take appropriate care to prevent acid spills, marble is a good choice.

If you want a beautiful and low maintenance engineered stone countertop, quartz will be a great fit for your home. It even works great as a backsplash to complement your countertop. Quartz offers many benefits as long as you are careful and avoid overheating and scorching the surface.

If you want a countertop that may require more maintenance but looks incredible in any light, marble might be for you. Finally, if you want low maintenance and don’t need to be sealed like granite, then quartz is ideal.

No matter which stone you choose, you are sure to have a beautiful home that you will love to show off to friends and family. No matter which stone you choose for your new countertops, you’re getting one of the best options for using in your home. The ideal stone material for your home can be determined by weighing the several variables that were stated and discussed above. If you have any questions, please feel free to contact us!

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